Everyday People: Making Waves for Others

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In just over a year (this is the second), SurfAid’s Make A Wave program has clearly earned a special place in the hearts of surfers around the world.

Its simple premise – sign up! surf all September! helping people! – just logging in, to the point where over 4000 of us have signed up and are fully engaged in the process of surfing, helping, etc. Indeed, we are already in five days.

That means the rest of us will have to settle for supporting some of the bold 4000s, which you can do, very easily, right here on their site.

But who are these 4000? Where do they surf, what brought them? We pulled five pretty much at random from Make A Wave’s full list, to see if there were any commonalities.

Jackson, 47, Grace 17, Lily, 15 and Max, 13, Avoca, NSW

Lily English with 15th birthday pressie – just in time for this month.

Surfing: Mainly the Avoca section with the Tebb family: Nige, Kiah, Will and Talia. Avoca Boardriders have signed up to be part of this great event.

Pattern: We’ve had a long involvement with SurfAid having done a bunch of fundraising initiatives with them since around 2006.

The hardest/easiest part of this mission? The hardest part, explaining to my boss why I’m going to be late for work every day. The simplest way is to go surfing rather than doing lengths in the pool.

Is that a big call, 30 days straight? We try to get into the ocean every day, whatever the conditions, so I don’t think it will be too difficult. Hope my body holds up.

Have you ever visited the places where Surf Aid money is spent? Yes! In ten years of living in Singapore I have done about 30 Indo descents, it has given me a real appreciation for the work of SurfAid.

33 Kiama NSW

Charging! You must love Kathy’s Moss.

Surfing: Mainly around Kiama, but take a short trip to northern New South Wales in the middle of the month.

Pattern: I did this mission last year with some of our local surfers, Tropical Winter. As a water and wastewater engineer, I particularly believe in the power of sanitation infrastructure in developing countries to improve all social outcomes. And being able to raise money doing something I love – what could be better.

The hardest/easiest part of this mission? The hardest part will be going out before or after work when it’s cold, really big or really small. The easiest part is the energy of the home team, which brings so many good vibes that even a foot mush can turn you on

Is that a big call, 30 days straight? I’m definitely on the verge of having a surfing addiction (no honestly – there’s an addiction checklist for drug and alcohol users, and I’m ticking a few too many boxes). However, it will be a bit difficult to go out every day before work.

Have you ever visited the places where Surf Aid money is spent? I have been to Indo but not to Sumatra. Would love to visit!

43 Sunshine Coast Queensland

Photographer Dan.

Surfing: Home on the Sunshine Coast except for the first weekend I’ll be in Sydney for vacation.

Pattern: Ray Bischoff of Surfing Life asked me to do this as part of the Surfing Life team last year and I found I had a very positive response from friends and companies with whom I treat regularly.

The hardest/easiest part of this mission? I just had a few skin cancers removed so I still have a few stitches left which isn’t ideal, and the Sunshine Coast is notoriously awful in the spring, northerly winds, small swells, blue flies… that should be fun.

Is that a big call, 30 days straight? I’m a surf photographer so I take a lot more pictures than catching waves these days my body is a bit strained from my day job so surfing every day is not an easy task for me… luckily this year I live 100 meters walk from one of the best waves on the coast, so that will help.

Have you ever visited the places where Surf Aid money is spent? I have been to Sumbawa and Java and am planning to go to Sumatra and possibly Solomon Islands this year.

43, San Diego, CA

Damo, surf star and fisherman.

Surfing: Around the house.

Pattern: Honored to help.

The hardest/easiest part of this mission? The hardest part will be not missing a day, or going out when it’s flat. The easiest is when the waves are good.

Is that a big call, 30 days straight? I love the motivation and responsibility it brings me.

Have you ever visited the places where Surf Aid money is spent? Yeah, I’ve caught some of the waves of my life in that part of the world, and that’s one of the ways I can say thank you to the people there.

12, Kaikoura, New Zealand

Supergrommet Sacha and his spectacular house.

Surfing: Mangamaunu or Meatworks and I do it with my friend. Riding my 5’7″ zebra board made by my dad.

Pattern: Probably the idea behind it and being able to surf everyday for a whole month.

The hardest/easiest part of this mission? Definitely freezing water, but should be easy to get waves.

Is that a big call, 30 days straight? Most of the time, you can find me at the beach, so that’s pretty normal.

Have you ever visited the places where Surf Aid money is spent? No, but I would like one day!

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You can donate through any of these five, or comb through the list, see if a buddy is out there somewhere. Heck, there’s 4000 in there, so we wouldn’t be surprised at all.

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Surf these areas in the near future: lawyer | kiama | Sunny coast | Seaside, California | Kaikoura

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